Pratt Institute, Brooklyn, New York
Oct
5
6:30 pm18:30
American Art Up Close Lecture Series: Gwendolyn Dubois Shaw on Sargent Johnson’s "Dorothy C."—Visualizing Race and Romance During the Great Depression
Apr
21
6:00 pm18:00

American Art Up Close Lecture Series: Gwendolyn Dubois Shaw on Sargent Johnson’s "Dorothy C."—Visualizing Race and Romance During the Great Depression

  • Art Institute of Chicago

In the late 1930s, the sculptor Sargent Johnson began making lithographs at the Federal Art Project's San Francisco print workshop.  Among the works that he created was a highly abstract image of a woman moving through the urban space of a city, her face obscured by a net veil.  Titled Dorothy C., the piece would seem to be a portrait of a specific woman that the artist knew.  But who was this Dorothy and why did Johnson choose to commemorate her in this oblique way?  This presentation examines issues of race and romance in the work of this under appreciated Harlem Renaissance- era artist.

Presented with the Terra Foundation for American Art 

Art Institute of Chicago, Fullerton Auditorium

"Portraiture in the Age of the Selfie: Identity, Race, and Belonging in the 21st Century"
Feb
3
4:30 pm16:30

"Portraiture in the Age of the Selfie: Identity, Race, and Belonging in the 21st Century"

Swarthmore College Black Cultural Center

Black History Month 2016 Presents: "Lift Every Voice"

Wednesday, February 3

Lecture: “Portraiture in the Age of the Selfie:  Identity, Race, and Belonging in the 21st Century”

Kohlberg Hall, Scheuer Room, 4:30PM- 6:00PM

Featuring Gwendolyn Dubois ShawAssociate Professor and Undergraduate Chair in the Department of History of Art at the University of Pennsylvania, this lecture focuses on portrait photography, issues of time, place, and the construction of family in the current moment.

 

Art by African Americans in the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston: Celebrating the Common Wealth
Jan
14
10:30 am10:30

Art by African Americans in the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston: Celebrating the Common Wealth

  • Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

Join us for the launch of a new MFA publication, Common Wealth: Art by African Americans in the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. Presentations by eminent scholars, collectors, and curators explore these important and fascinating works of art and discuss many of the recent acquisitions from the John P. Axelrod Collection. With:

John P. Axelrod, Eminent Benefactor 
Elliot Bostwick Davis, John Moors Cabot Chair, Art of the Americas 
Edmund Barry Gaither, director and curator, Museum of the National Center of Afro-American Artists 
Andrew Haines, associate conservator, Furniture and Frame Conservation 
Michael Rosenfeld, principal, Michael Rosenfeld Gallery
Gwendolyn Shaw, honorary overseer; associate professor and undergraduate chair, American Art, University of Pennsylvania 
Lowery Sims, William and Mildred Lasdon Chief Curator, Museum of Art and Design

January 14, 2015
10:30 am – 12:30 pm
Harry and Mildred Remis Auditorium (Auditorium 161)

Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

 

 

 

 

Reenactor A conversation and 72-hour continuous screening by William Pope.L revisiting this country's violent legacy and haunting past
Dec
8
6:30 pm18:30

Reenactor A conversation and 72-hour continuous screening by William Pope.L revisiting this country's violent legacy and haunting past

  • Slought Foundation

Slought, the History of Art and the English Department at the University of Pennsylvania are pleased to announce a special screening of William Pope.L'sReenactor (2010-) from December 9-11, 2014. The film will be screened continuously for 72 hours at Slought on Tuesday, December 9, beginning at 9am. A public conversation with the artist and art historian Gwendolyn DuBois Shaw on December 8, 2014 at 6:30pm will inaugurate the screening.

Filmed in Nashville, Reenactor shows volunteers - many of them students from Tennessee State University where the film debuted - donning Robert E. Lee confederate soldier uniforms or what the artist describes as "the most visible and onerous costumes of our historical past." Pope.L followed the "swarm" of reenactors as they wandered around Nashville performing quotidian activities, such as sweeping floors and caring for children. Through this intervention, the violent history of the South seeps into the fabric of everyday life, haunting this city with its most disquieting legacies. Pope.L's film alternates between different modes of filmmaking and performance, including documentary-style footage, a surreal puppet show, and Civil War reenactments in Pennsylvania.

Like many of the works in the Itinerant Belongings exhibition, the film eschews a fixed diegesis and unitary temporality. This logic extends to Reenactor's extensive duration in the gallery space. Viewers are invited to defy the conventions of traditional spectatorship and absorb the experience of the film into the rhythms of their everyday by resting on couches and beanbag chairs, drinking and eating, and even sleeping at any hour.

 

What is American Art?
Dec
2
6:00 pm18:00

What is American Art?

  • Penn Lightbulb Café @ World Café Live

As we move toward an increasingly pluralistic society in the United States, one in which political and social parity is being achieved by greater segments of society, the idea that works of art should be discussed in separate groups based on a perception of a shared “identity” among the objects’ makers (blacks, women, queers), rather than on the works’ thematic or conceptual affinities, seems increasingly regressive. And yet, such practices persist. Prof. DuBois Shaw's talk will examine the contemporary art historical, curatorial and critical strategies and tactics for using such markers as race, gender, sexuality and regional identity to interpret art today.